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Money for Nothing

Presenter: Bryan Curtis
Market Wraps / Asia Pollution / Consumer confidence / The World Cup


The Confederations Cup final happens on Sunday in Brazil. The tournament, which is a dress-rehearsal for next year's football World Cup finals, has been dogged by protests against its cost which is estimated at $15 billion. Why is the World Cup so expensive? On Money For Nothing we'll ask our sports contributor, Daniel Hicks. We'll also talk with FT journalist, Christopher Brooks, about China's factories polluting California airspace. We'll also talk with Ken Goldstein of The Conference Board in New York about consumer confidence in the US, and with Tobias Hekster, finance professor at CUHK about the mayhem  of the markets. (8am-8.30am,  facebookmoneyfornothing@rthk.hk)

8.03 am - News highlight of the day

* US stocks moved higher for a third day

* New Apple TV ad is a flop; it portrays the company as being "self indulgent"

* Fitch cuts China GDP forecast

* China coal sold at lowest price in 5...

* US consumers spent more in May

* More Fed officials chatise feral hogs

* Europe stocks rise for third day

* EU deal to restructure failing banks


8.18 am - Asian pollution

Asian-born pollutants can be projected into the lower-free troposphere and catch a ride on the jet stream, sometimes arriving in California in as little as 4 days. The Financial Times' Christopher Booker tells us how large and how serious of an issue this is.


8.20 am - Consumer confidence

Four years after the end of the Great Recession, the consumer is back – but not with a vengeance. Consumption continues to show improvement, and yet Americans still clutch their wallets. Ken Goldstein, an economist with the New York-based Conference Board tells us why the glass is only half full.


8.25 am - The World Cup

The Confederations Cup final happens on Sunday in Brazil. The tournament, which is dress-rehearsal for next year's football World Cup finals, has been dogged by protests against cost which is estimated at $15 billion. Why is the World Cup so expensive? We'll ask our sports contributor, Daniel Hicks.